February 11, 2008

A Road Called Doque...

As our family begins to learn a new language, so many words and phrases make us laugh. It seems that the word sounds like another work in English or that the phrase if translated literally makes no sense. Now, this is not something that happen only as a English speaker learns Portuguese, I am sure it something that takes place as anyone learns a new language. So, without further ado, here is our list:
~Fartar
In Brazilian Portuguese, a verb meaning to gorge or to become feed up with.
In English, well do I need to tell you what this sounds like?
~Ruth
In English, a common name.
In Brazilian Portuguese this name would be pronounced… hoo-chee. This for an English speaker would not be a good translation of the name.
~Boca do Fag√£o
In Brazilian Portuguese, a phrase used for the burner on a stove.
In English, well, literally translated means ‘mouth of the stove.’
~A toalha de mesa
In Brazilian Portuguese, a phrase used for the tablecloth.
In English, well, literally translated means ‘towel of the table.’
~Dia Da Mentira
In Brazilian Portuguese, a holiday on April 1st.
In English, well, literally translated means ‘day of lying.’ We have the same holiday but like to call it April Fools Day.
~Dirija-se a outro Caixa (a sign at the post office)
In Brazilian Portuguese, a phrase used to ask you to move to the next window for service.
In English, well, literally translated means ‘drive to the next box.’

~Duque (a sign for a main road in the city)
In Brazilian Portuguese, pronounced 'doo-kee'.
In English, well, sounds like a slang name for something.

~Eu ando no meu carro
In Brazilian Portuguese, a phrase that means I am driving my car.
In English, in a way, if you did not know Portuguese, it could literally mean 'I am walking my car'... for you not only walk yourself but you walk your bike, motorcyle, car, and you even walk the public bus.